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Aug
2

Looking back at the World Para Athletics in London

World Para Athletics 2017

During the recent World Para Athletics in London it was impossible to watch the events without feeling inspired and in awe of what people are able to achieve.

Many of our clients have cerebral palsy as a result of negligence and we understand the importance of early interventions, to include physiotherapy, hydrotherapy and occupational therapy and the essential role that this can play in improving an individual’s quality of life. It was encouraging to see so many individuals who will be able to inspire people with cerebral palsy and show them what they can also achieve.

I wanted to have a look back at the recent events and some of the incredible individuals who took home a medal (or three!) for Great Britain:

  • Jonnie Peacock MBE won a gold medal for the men’s T44 100m. T44 is for athletes with single below knee amputation or an athlete who can walk with moderately reduced function in one or both legs. Peacock contracted meningitis at the age of five which killed tissues in his right leg which was amputated just below the knee.
  • Richard Whitehead MBE won a gold medal for the men’s T42 200m and a bronze medal for the men’s T42 100m. T42 is for athletes with single above knee amputations or comparable disabilities. Whitehead had a double through knee congenital amputation.
  • Aled Davies MBE won a gold medal for the men’s F42 discus and a gold medal for the men’s F42 shot put. F42 is the same as T42 but for field athletes rather than track athletes. Davies was born with hemimelia of the right leg
  • Hannah Cockroft MBE won a gold medal for the women’s T34 100m, a gold medal for the women’s T34 400m and a gold medal for the Women’s T34 800m. T34 is for athletes with cerebral palsy and one of four for athletes with cerebral palsy who use a wheelchair. People in this class have hypertonia, ataxia and athetosis. Cockroft was born with cerebral palsy which damaged different parts of her brain and she was told she would never be able to walk, talk or live past teenage years.
  • Georgie Hermitage MBE won a gold medal for the women’s T37 100m, gold for the women’s T37 400m. T37 includes people who have coordination impairments such as hypertonia, ataxia and athetosis. Hermitage has cerebral palsy which mainly affects the left side of her body.
  • Sophie Hahn MBE won a gold medal for the women’s T38 100m and a gold medal for the women’s T38 200m. T38 includes people who have coordination impairments such as hypertonia, ataxia and athetosis. Runners in this class may appear to have a slight limp when they are running but otherwise have a stride similar to able-bodied runners. Hahn has cerebral palsy.
  • Kadeena Cox MBE won a gold medal for the women’s T38 400m, a silver medal for the women’s T38 100m and a bronze medal for the women’s T38 200m. Cox had previously competed at a high level for able bodied athletes but was no longer able to following a stroke in 2014.
  • Olivia Breen won a gold medal for the women’s T38 long jump. Breen has cerebral palsy.
  • Sophie Kamlish won a gold medal for the women’s T44 100m. T44 applies to single below knee amputation or an athlete who can walk with moderately reduced function in one or both legs. Kamlish was born with a right foot which was severely turned in and she underwent a below the knee amputation.
  • Stef Reid won a gold medal for the women’s T44 long jump. Reid lost her right foot in a boating accident aged 16.
  • Samantha Kinghorn won a gold medal for the women’s T53 100m, a gold medal for the women’s T53 200m and a bronze medal for the women’s T53 400m. T53 includes people with a number of different types of disabilities including spinal cord injuries. People in this class have full use of their arms but have no or limited trunk function. Kinghorn was crushed by snow and ice at the age of 14, breaking her back and leaving her paralysed from waist down.
  • Hollie Arnold MBE won a gold medal for the Women’s F46 javelin. Individuals in this class have a single below or above the elbow amputation. Arnold was born without her right forearm.

If you are caring for a child who has been disabled by Cerebral Palsy, call us 0800 029 4664 or email mednegclaims@boyesturner.com.

Consistent with our policy when giving comment and advice on a non-specific basis, we cannot assume legal responsibility for the accuracy of any particular statement. In the case of specific problems we recommend that professional advice be sought. This news story comes from publicly available sources. Where it concerns one or more of our clients this is clearly stated.

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